JavaBeanReader

Short Description
Ports
Metadata
JavaBeanReader Attributes
Details
See also

Short Description

JavaBeanReader reads a JavaBeans hierarchical structure which is stored in a dictionary. This allows dynamic data interchange between CloverDX graphs and external environment, such as the cloud. The dictionary you are reading to serves as an interface between the outer (e.g. the cloud) and inner worlds (CloverDX).

ComponentData sourceInput portsOutput portsEach to all outputsDifferent to different outputsTransformationTransf. req.JavaCTLAuto-propagated metadata
JavaBeanReaderdictionary01-n
no
yes
no
no
no
no
yes

Ports

Port typeNumberRequiredDescriptionMetadata
Output0
yes
Successfully read records.Any
1-nConnect other output ports if your mapping requires it.Successfully read records. Any. Each port can have different metadata.

Metadata

JavaBeanReader does not propagate metadata.

JavaBeanReader has no metadata template.

JavaBeanReader Attributes

AttributeReqDescriptionPossible values
Basic
Dictionary sourceyesThe dictionary you want to read JavaBeans from.The name of a dictionary you have previously defined.
Data policy 

Determines the action after an error on reading occurs. For more information, see Data Policy.

Strict (default) | Controlled | Lenient
Mapping[1]

Mapping the input JavaBeans structure to output ports. For more information, see JavaBeanReader Mapping Definition.

 
Mapping URL[1]The external text file containing the mapping definition. 
Implicit mapping 

By default, you have to manually map input elements even to Clover fields of the same name. If you switch to true, JSON-to-CloverDX mapping on matching names will be performed automatically. This can save you a lot of effort in long and well-structured JSON files. See JSON Mapping - Specifics.

false (default) | true

[1]  One of these has to be specified. If both are specified, Mapping URL has a higher priority.

Details

JavaBeanReader reads data from JavaBeans through a dictionary. It maps Java attributes / collection elements to output records based on a mapping you define. You do not have to map the whole input file - you use XPath expressions to select only the data you need. The component sends data to different connected output records as defined by your mapping.

The mapping process is similar to the one in XMLReader.

JavaBeanReader Mapping Definition

  1. Every Mapping definition consists of <Context> tags which also contain some attributes and allow mapping of element names to Clover fields. Nested structure of <Context> tags is similar to the nested structure of elements in input JavaBeans.

  2. Each <Context> tag can surround a serie of nested <Mapping> tags. These allow to rename JavaBeans elements to Clover fields. However, Mapping does not need to copy the whole input structure, it can start at an arbitrary depth in the tree.

  3. Each of these <Context> and <Mapping> tags contains some JavaBeanReader Context Tag Attributes and JavaBeanReader Mapping Tag Attributes, respectively.

    Example 55.5. Example Mapping in JavaBeanReader

    <Context xpath="/employees" outPort="0" sequenceId="empSeq" sequenceField="id">
            <Mapping xpath="firstName" cloverField="firstName"/>
            <Mapping xpath="lastName" cloverField="lastName"/>
            <Mapping xpath="salary" cloverField="salary"/>
            <Mapping xpath="jobTitle" cloverField="jobTitle"/>
            <Context xpath="children" outPort="1" parentKey="id" generatedKey="empID">
                <Mapping xpath="name" cloverField="chname"/>
                <Mapping xpath="age" cloverField="age"/>
            </Context>
            <Context xpath="benefits" outPort="2" parentKey="id" generatedKey="empID">
                <Mapping xpath="car" cloverField="car"/>
                <Mapping xpath="cellPhone" cloverField="mobilephone"/>
                <Mapping xpath="monthlyBonus" cloverField="monthlyBonus"/>
                <Mapping xpath="yearlyBonus" cloverField="yearlyBonus"/>
            </Context>
            <Context xpath="projects" outPort="3" parentKey="id" generatedKey="empID">
                <Mapping xpath="name" cloverField="projName"/>
                <Mapping xpath="manager" cloverField="projManager"/>
                <Mapping xpath="start" cloverField="Start"/>
                <Mapping xpath="end" cloverField="End"/>
                <Mapping xpath="customers" cloverField="customers"/>
            </Context>
        </Context>

    [Important]Important

    If you switch Implicit mapping to true, the elements (e.g. salary) will be automatically mapped onto fields of the same name (salary) and you do not have to write:

    <Mapping xpath="salary" cloverField="salary"/>

    and you map explicitly only to populate fields with data from distinct elements.

  4. JavaBeanReader Context Tags and Mapping Tags

  5. JavaBeanReader Context Tag and Mapping Tag Attributes

    1) JavaBeanReader Context Tag Attributes

    • xpath

      Required

      The xpath expression can be any XPath query.

      Example: xpath="/tagA/.../tagJ"

    • outPort

      Optional

      The number of output port to which data is sent. If not defined, no data from this level of Mapping is sent out using such level of Mapping.

      Example: outPort="2"

    • parentKey

      Both parentKey and generatedKey must be specified.

      A sequence of metadata fields on the next parent level separated by a semicolon, colon, or pipe. The number and data types of all these fields must be the same in the generatedKey attribute or all values are concatenated to create a unique string value. In such a case, the key has only one field.

      Example: parentKey="first_name;last_name"

      Equal values of these attributes assure that such records can be joined in the future.

    • generatedKey

      Both parentKey and generatedKey must be specified.

      A sequence of metadata fields on the specified level separated by a semicolon, colon, or pipe. The number and data types of all these fields must be the same in the parentKey attribute or all values are concatenated to create a unique string value. In such a case, the key has only one field.

      Example: generatedKey="f_name;l_name"

      Equal values of these attributes assure that such records can be joined in the future.

    • sequenceId

      When a pair of parentKey and generatedKey does not insure unique identification of records, a sequence can be defined and used.

      Id of the sequence.

      Example: sequenceId="Sequence0"

    • sequenceField

      When a pair of parentKey and generatedKey does not insure unique identification of records, a sequence can be defined and used.

      A metadata field on the specified level in which the sequence values are written. Can serve as parentKey for the next nested level.

      Example: sequenceField="sequenceKey"

    2) JavaBeanReader Mapping Tag Attributes

    • xpath

      Either xpath or nodeName must be specified in the <Mapping> tag.

      XPath query.

      Example: xpath="tagA/.../salary"

    • nodeName

      Either xpath or nodeName must be specified in the <Mapping> tag. Using nodeName is faster than using xpath.

      The JavaBeans node that should be mapped to Clover field.

      Example: nodeName="salary"

    • cloverField

      Required

      Clover field to which the JavaBeans node should be mapped.

      The name of the field in the corresponding level.

      Example: cloverFields="SALARY"

Reading Multivalue Fields

As of CloverDX 3.3, reading multivalue fields is supported - you can read only lists, however (see Multivalue Fields).

[Note]Note

Reading maps is handled as reading pure string (for all data types as map's values).

Example 55.6. Reading lists with JavaBeanReader

An example input file containing a list of three elements: John, Vicky, Brian

can be read back by the component with this mapping:

<Mapping xpath="attendees" cloverField="attendanceList"/>

where attendanceList is a field of your metadata. The metadata has to be assigned to the component's output edge. After you run the graph, the field will get populated by data like this (what appears in View data):

[John,Vicky,Brian]


Data conversions in JavaBeanReader

The possible conversions of Java data types to CTL2 data types are described in the following table.

The list in the table means a list of corresponding data type.

Table 55.6. Java data type to CTL2 data type conversion

Java data typesCTL2 data types
Numeric data typesbooleandatebytecbyteStringlistmap
integerlongnumber (double)decimal
int
yes
yes
yes
yes
-
no
--
yes
yes
no
long-
yes
yes
--
yes
--
yes
no
no
float--
yes
-
no
no
--
yes
yes
no
double--
yes
-
no
no
--
yes
yes
no
boolean
yes
yes
yes
no
yes
no
--
yes
yes
no
java.util.Date
no
yes
no
no
no
yes
--
yes
yes
no
String-----
no
--
yes
yes
no
array []-----
no
----
no
java.util.Collection-----
no
---
yes
no

Conversions are explained below:

Java int to CTL2 boolean

Value 0 is converted to false, 1 is converted to true. If Java int contains other value, the graph fails.

Java int to CTL2 byte or cbyte

The value of the int variable is converted either to a character or to an empty string.

Java long to CTL2 integer

The value of the Java bean long variable can be read to the integer field provided the value is within the range of CTL2 integer. If the value is out of the range of CTL2 integer, the graph fails.

Java long to CTL2 decimal

The decimal needs to have a sufficient length to contain a value from long data type. The default length (12) might not be enough for all cases.

Java long to CTL2 boolean

The conversion from Java long to CTL2 boolean works in the same way as conversion from Java int to CTL2 boolean. 0 is converted to false, 1 is converted to true, other values cause a failure.

Java long to CTL2 byte or cbyte

See: Java int to CTL2 byte or cbyte conversion.

Java float to CTL2 integer

Value of the Java float variable can be converted to CTL2 integer. The value of the float number is being truncated in the conversion. If the value in float variable is out of range of integer, the conversion fails.

Java float to CTL2 long

The value of the Java float variable can be converted to CTL2 long. The value of the float number is being truncated. If the value stored in the float variable is positive and out of range of the long data type, the nearest long value is used. If the value stored in the float variable is negative and out of range of the long data type, the result is null.

Java float to CTL2 decimal

CTL2 decimal needs to have a sufficient length. If not, the conversion from Java float fails.

Java float to CTL2 byte and cbyte

The value of Java float is trimmed to its integral part and the result value is converted to a character. If the value is out of range of byte, an empty string is used.

Java double to CTL2 integer

The value of Java double needs to be within range of CTL2 integer. The value of Java double is truncated to its integral part towards zero. If the value is out of range, the conversion fails.

Java double to CTL2 long

If the value of Java doubleis within range of CTL2 long, the value is truncated to the nearest integral value towards zero. If the value of Java double is positive and out of range of CTL2 long, the result is the largest long number (Long.MAX_VALUE). If the value of Java double is negative and out of range of CTL long, the result is null.

Java double to CTL2 decimal

The CTL2 decimal needs to have a sufficient length to contain the value of Java double. In case of insufficient length of CTL2 decimal, the conversion fails.

Java double to CTL2 byte and cbyte

The value of Java double is trimmed to its integral part and the result is converted to a character. If the value is out of range of byte, an empty string is used.

Java boolean to CTL2 byte and cbyte

The value of Java boolean converted to CTL2 byte or cbyte is a single unprintable character. The character has the code 0 if the input is false or 1 if the input is true.

Java Date to CTL2 byte and cbyte

The value of Java Date converted to byte or cbyte results in an empty string.

Java String to CTL2 integer or long

If the Java String variable contains integral value within range of integer, the number will be converted. Otherwise the conversion fails.

If the java String variable contains integral value within range of long, the number will be converted to long. Otherwise the conversion fails.

Java String to CTL2 number (double) or decimal

If the Java String contains a numeric value, the value is converted to number (double) or decimal. If the Java String does not contain a numeric value, the conversion fails.

Java String to CTL2 boolean

If the Java String contains the value 1, true, True or TRUE, CTL2 boolean will hold true.

If Java String contains the value 0, false, False or FALSE, CTL2 boolean will hold false.

If any other value is present in the Java String, the conversion fails.

Java String to CTL2 byte or cbyte

Java String to byte or cbyte conversion has an empty string as a result.

Java array to CTL2

The conversion of a Java bean array to integer, long, number (double) and decimal has zero as a result.

The result of the conversion from a Java array CTL2 boolean is false.

Java array converted to byte and cbyte is null.

Java Collection to CTL2

The conversion from Java Collection to integer, long, double, decimal, String returns first item of collection.

Collection to byte and cbyte conversion has an empty string as a result.

See also

Data Types in CTL2
Data Types in Metadata
JavaBeanWriter
Common Properties of Components
Specific Attribute Types
Common Properties of Readers
Readers Comparison